Author: Ingeborg Eliassen

Il Fatto Quotidiano (Italy) | Norway: a manual on how to fight against precarious jobs

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Grain silo with mural in Rogaland. Astrid Westvang / Flickr. Artist: Pøbel

They come with their minds full of questions, Stavanger’s unemployed, today to the «Terminal», a glass palace in the city harbour. Passengers used to leave with ferries for Denmark and England from this dock. Today, some of the 822 that were invited here by the Employment Office may decide to leave, but to other regions of Norway. Regions that are fishing for workers.

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Aftenbladet & Fædrelandsvennen (Norway) | There is hope for young Greeks – just not in Greece

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On New Year's Eve, at the emergencies of Papageorgiou Hospital in Thessaloniki. From left to right: Georgia Christodolou, 32, surgeon, Giorgos Toulias, surgeon, Dimitris Spanos, surgeon. Credit: Nikos Pilos

Hundreds of thousands of young Greeks have turned their backs on depleted public services, dead labour markets and worsening working conditions. Germany wants them. Meanwhile, the Greek health system feels the brain drain. Published in NORWEGIAN by Aftenbladet.

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Aftenbladet & Fædrelandsvennen (Norway) | Stay in or out of the European Economic Area? This is the question at work

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Boye Ullmann & Jonas Bals at an Oslo building site. Credit: Gorm K. Gaare, EUP-Berlin

Norway has been a quasi-member of the EU since entering the EEA agreement in 1994. Very few discuss the contract in the general public sphere. But the issue has grown to enormous proportions in the labour movement. Can Norway retain safe and decent labour conditions without exiting the EEA? Published in NORWEGIAN by Aftenbladet.

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Why Europe’s dependency on Microsoft is a huge security risk

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This dependency is solid. Credit: Martin Abegglen/flickr

On May 12 hackers hit more than a hundred countries exploiting a stolen N.S.A. tool that targeted vulnerabilities of Microsoft software. The attacks infected only machines running Windows. Among the victims are public administrative bodies such as NHS hospitals in the UK. Investigate Europe spent months to investigate the dire dependency of European countries on Microsoft – and the security risks this entails. Read our full investigation in ENGLISH.

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Norway: Aftenbladet / Bergens Tidende “Uten Microsoft stopper Europa”

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European public administrations have chained themselves to Microsoft’s toolbox of word documents, excel sheets, powerpoint presentations and outlook. It costs billions. The lock-in is not the fault of Microsoft, but of the public administrations that have allowed themselves to be locked in, says Björn Lundell. He is a professor of computer science at Högskolan i Skövde, Sweden. Read more in NORWEGIAN.

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Uncounted: Invisible Deaths on Europe’s Borders

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One section of the cemetery in Castellammare del Golfo in Sicily has been reserved for drowned migrants. Just a few of them have names on them. Credit: Ingeborg Eliassen

There is no official record of the number of refugees who go missing crossing the Mediterranean Sea trying to reach Europe. This is not a coincidence. Our investigation as published via News Deeply IN ENGLISH.

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PORTUGAL: “Mortes que não se contam – Deaths that don’t count”

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One section of the cemetery in Castellammare del Golfo in Sicily has been reserved for drowned migrants. Just a few of them have names on them. Credit: Ingeborg Eliassen

2017: At the European borders thousands of refugees die. But the exact number remains unknown, the dead uncounted. This is a story about those who dedicate their effort to humanize the tragedy, struggling to identify the bodies, making burial ceremonies, recording the events. But those who die this way won’t become a political issue unless they are counted. Read more in PORTUGUESE.

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BLOG: The king’s speech and the queen’s echo

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The Norwegian royal family itself has a complex immigration background. Photo: Sven Gj. Gjeruldsen, The royal court

The governments of Denmark and Norway are competing in making their public the most timid in Europe. In both countries the immigration debate has changed, slowly but surely, first in Denmark, then in Norway. It’s become poisonous. It is increasingly about identity – what it means to be Danish, what it means to be Norwegian – in contrast to “the others” who are not, even if they might be living in the country. Norway is lagging a bit. We have King Harald.

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